October 31, 2012

  • Chinese Villager Set on Fire, By Demolition Crew or Himself?

    Chinese Villager Set on Fire, By Demolition Crew or Himself?

    An elderly Chinese villager on fire in Hunan province.

    From Sina Weibo: (no longer available)

    @浣铁军: Demolishing and relocation – The blood curdling shrieks of a living person set on fire! Ripping apart the hearts of every Chinese person: The wretched sight of a living person being set of fire pierces the clear eyes of every Chinese person! Yet another elderly person burned like charcoal and close to death lies in the hospital! On October 14th, in the Yunfeng neighborhood of Xiangtang City, Hunan Province, and as a result of demolition and relocation talks that have been continuously failed, those responsible for the demolition recruited members of the criminal underworld to inhumanly beat up and then set on fire a nearly 60-year-old elderly man. The blood curdling shrieks of a living person set on fire! Ripping apart the hearts of every Chinese person!

    Photos of an elderly Chinese man set on fire in Hunan province of China over a demolition and relocation dispute.

    An elderly Chinese man in Hunan with burns after allegedly being set on fire by demolition crews. The fires have been put out.

    An elderly Chinese man in Hunan with burns after allegedly being set on fire by demolition crews. The fires have been put out.

    An elderly Chinese man in Hunan with burns after allegedly being set on fire by demolition crews. The fires have been put out.

    An elderly Chinese man in Hunan with burns after allegedly being set on fire by demolition crews. The fires have been put out.

    Comments from Sina Weibo: (no longer available)

    崔亮zen:

    Reposting/forwarding in anger! Many people say: You cannot change anything, life is what it is. But, if you want this world to become better, you only need to be a good person yourself. You can totally make this world a little bit better, even if it is just that little bit. Repost/forward, it truly is a kind of strength/power.

    Dre_袁尒欣:

    When these things become habitual, what meaning is there for the continued existence of this country?

    香草山-朱师傅:

    I rarely repost/forward ["retweet"] this kind [of news], because there is too much. But this is truly unbearable, although whether this s true or bogus is still waiting to be determined.

    我叫黄恬啦:

    Do they not have any humanity? Motherfuckers.

    娘了个白大腿:

    In this barbaric land, it is inevitable that there will be barbaric people.

    炖-dun:

    Are these people still people?

    方舟溯大江:

    Political environment is the air, and those people who don’t care about politics are shameful! The actions of Xiangtan’s [of Hunan province] local governments infuriates both the people and god!

    沈斐的花园:

    Come on, this is way too savage [going too far]! In the past, there was at least a loincloth, but now it’s just completely naked insanity [there used to at least be some restraint and shame, but now it is shameless and open violence].

    巴陵惑:

    This kind of country does not deserve love [patriotism].

    小茉儿:

    This country, for money and houses, is no longer human.

    From Xinhua (on Sina Weibo):

    Hunan Xiangtan demolition and relocation staff engaged in demolition of home without permission causing villager to self-immolate

    Xiangtan city report, the news about Xiangtan demolition and relocation personnel setting a homeowner to be relocated on fire is an incident of the builder acting on their own to tear down the [victim's] home causing the villager to set himself on fire. In order to get the engineering/construction project and without obtaining the permission of the relevant departments, Zhongtian Company project manager Qiang Yuqing and Xiangtan city Baota Street Yunfeng neighborhood villager Feng Changsheng (village party secretary’s brother) directly caused this villager Shi Ganming’s self-immolation. (Reporter Liu Lianghen

    Who do you believe?

    A home being demolished by an excavator.

    http://www.chinasmack.com/2012/pictures/chinese-villager-set-on-fire-by-demolition-crew-or-himself.html

     

  • China’s ‘Basketball Grandma’ fighting aging and poverty becomes Internet star

    China’s ‘Basketball Grandma’ fighting aging and poverty becomes Internet star

    October 18, 2012Jing Gao3 Comments, , , , , ,

    Zhu Shumei, 76, has captured Chinese net users’ hearts lately. Standing only 150 cm tall (5 ft.), the hunchbacked granny plays basketball every day on a university campus in Jinhua, Zhejiang province in East China. After photos of her exercising got viral on Chinese social media, netizens gave her a lovely nickname: “Basketball Grandma.”

    Zhu has been playing basketball since 20 years ago. It is said that she almost never misses a shot. In addition to basketball, her daily exercise routines also include running, parallel bars and pole-climbing.

    A student of Zhejiang Normal University, impressed by the sight of the energetic and sporty grandma, took pictures of her and uploaded them to Sina Weibo, Chinese hybrid of Facebook and Twitter, which immediately attracted a huge amount of attention. Many young net users said they were touched by the fighting spirits of the granny and felt ashamed of themselves.

    It is later learned that Zhu’s life is never as sunny as she seems. At 53, she was divorced by her ex-husband and had to take care of her mentally-ill daughter all by herself. Her income, all of which comes from the subsistance allowances meted out by the government, is so meager (437 yuan, or US$70, per month) and makes her so insecure about her future, that she started to exercise as much as possibly to avoid getting sick.

    Zhu was told by her local community that she would be entitled to a monthly pension of 1,100 yuan (US$175) if only she could make a 31,428-yuan (US$5,000) down payment to qualify for the pension program. She truly wished to join the program, however, the amount of money is far beyond what she could possibly afford.

    After the students at the university learned about her financial situation, they decided to help her by raising money on the internet. The good news is, not only have donations poured in, they have also found her a major contributor who is generous enough to improve her living conditions.

    It is said that Grandma Zhu has a 100-percent field goal percentage, although she said she has been put under a lot of pressure to prove herself as a great shooter after she became famous.

    The Spalding basketball in her hand, which cost her more than her monthly income, is her baby. In the summer, she gives it a cold bath every time before going to the court so that it will not explode from heat.

    She is 76 and only 150 cm tall because of having a hunchback.

    She has never owned a house of her own and has been having trouble paying the rent for her little dwelling unit, living off on a monthly allowance of 437 yuan, or US$70.

    Any idea why she exercises so hard? To avoid getting sick, because any illness leads to medical bills she can never pay off.

    Climbing the pole is a piece of cake to her.

    She also runs at least 10 laps on the 400-meter track every day.

    Parallel bars, chin-up bars…Nothing on the field daunts her.

    After her story was revealed on the web, she has become such a head-turner that she has to “hide” her basketball in a black garbage bag on her way to the basketball court.

    Grandma Zhu gets home from her practice.

    Her home is quite shabby.

    Grandma Zhu goes to a farmers’ market for grocery shopping.

    Smile is her attitude toward life.

    http://www.ministryoftofu.com/2012/10/chinas-basketball-grandma-fighting-aging-and-poverty-becomes-internet-star/

  • Chinese flags at half-mast for Cambodia’s former king Norodam Sihanouk anger netizens

    Chinese flags at half-mast for Cambodia’s former king Norodam Sihanouk anger netizens

    October 17, 2012Jing Gao2 Comments, , , , , , , , , , ,

    Chinese flags on a number of landmarks in Beijing, including Tiananmen Square, Xinhua Gate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Beijing’s airports, will be flown at half-mast all day Tuesday, as the body of former Cambodian king Norodom Sihanouk, who died of a heart attack at 90 in the city last week, is scheduled to be returned to his native land.

    Norodom Sihanouk has long been officially recognized in China as “Chinese people’s long-time friends,” a term widely misunderstood by ordinary Chinese people to be applied solely to Communist dictators or heads of states that are Beijing’s allies, when in fact Chinese government did use the term on politicians in democratic countries like Henry Kissinger and Richard Nixon who have worked to defrost or enhance relations with China. Other “Chinese people’s long-time friends” that fit this misconception include Muammar Gaddafi, Saddam Hussein, Nicolae Ceaușescu and Kim Jong-il.

    Sihanouk with Mao Zedong and then premier Zhou Enlai on Tiananmen Gate in 1970

    Sihanouk with former Chines president Jiang Zemin

    Sihanouk, in the eyes of the Chinese general public, was a dictator, for he befriended Beijing at a time when China was so isolated and so messed up that only despots in the Third World would want to be associated with it. Those who were born in before the 80s must also have been too familiar with the fact that Sihanouk was well accommodated in Beijing both as an exiled king following a coup in the 1970s and after his abdication in 2004.

    Even during his rule, he often flew to Beijing for treatment of his illness, with almost every expense paid for by Beijing. A news story published in state-run media even states that back in 1973, in preparation for a state-banquet hosted by then Chinese premier Zhou Enlai for him, a restaurant in Shanghai killed 208 chickens to collect chicken eggs needed for a single dish. Those who are particularly knowledgeable and well-informed also know that the former king once gave in to the Khmer Rouge, which was responsible for the mass killing of millions of Cambodians.

    Therefore, when the news came that Beijing flies flags at half-mast for him, many Chinese on the web were immediately angered. One post on Sina Weibo, a microblogging site that boasts hundreds of millions of users, accuses Chinese government of the gesture. Within three hours, it had been forwarded 11,802 times.

    [National mourning] For the bullet train crash in Wenzhou, no flag was flown at half-mast; for the school bus accident, no flag was flown at half-mast; for the July 21 Beijing rainstorm, no flag was flown at half-mast; for the landslide in Yunnan, no flag was flown at half-mast; for the fatal car accident during the Golden Week, no flag was flown at half-mast; for the fisherman shot to death by South Korean coast guard, no flag was flown at half-mast. Today, after the death of a Cambodian good-for-nothing old guy, who had freeloaded off us taxpayers for decades, you immediately flew the flag at half-mast. You guys make people’s hearts chill!

    Let’s take a quick look at a few of the most hard-hitting and acrimonious comments it has generated:

    越界影视:It is learned that those who made the original list for the half-mast-worthy included Muammar Gaddafi, Saddam Hussein, Nicolae Ceaușescu. But those were canceled for some reason.

    何胁社会:F**k your ancestors. So often Chinese people are killed for no good reason, and you fly the flag at half-mast for an old hooligan who cheated for free food and drink? Damn, so it wasn’t enough that he was fed for decades? Having been born in this country is a huge shame and joke. [怒]

    arr10新浪个人认证 :The ship collision in Hong Kong killed more than 30; both the Hong Kong government and PRC’s Liaison office in Hong Kong flew the flag at half-mast. The bus accident on the highway in the mainland burnt also more than 30, the government did not even give a shit. So it seems the mainland and China are still different…

    Cyn-C:If China were truly to fly the flag for deaths of the ordinary people, then the flag would not possibly be hoisted back.

    卢会长:So the face shown to the outside is more important than the face shown to the inside.

    牙医哥隋强新浪个人认证 :I wonder what he had done for the Chinese people.

    colvern微博达人:In addition to a freeloader, he was also a womanizer.

    sinesoft:Yesterday, a pig died in our village. These flags must have been flown for that.

    杜楠爆料:A Cambodian King died. Ministry of Foreign Affairs said it is an immense loss of the Chinese people. What have I lost? What have you lost? Where did this even come from?

    无畏上将高尔察克: One budget item has been lost when they write budget requests.

    http://www.ministryoftofu.com/2012/10/chinese-flags-at-half-mast-for-cambodias-former-king-norodam-sihanouk-anger-netizens/

  • 【杨宁】:《纽约时报》为

    【杨宁】:《纽约时报》为何敢曝光温家宝的黑材料?

    《纽时》爆料的内容来自周永康等江系残余势力,其目的就是打击温家宝,削弱其在党内的地位,进而改变薄案的审理结果。(AFP/Getty Images)

    【大纪元2012年10月31日讯】在温家宝家人聘请的律师发表声明,指责美国《纽约时报》10月26日头版刊登的关于温家宝家人积累“巨额资产”的报导不实,并称“将保留追究其法律责任的权利”后,《纽时》悄悄从其中国新闻首页将该报导撤下。目前各方的消息都显示,《纽时》爆料的内容来自周永康等江系残余势力,其目的就是打击温家宝,削弱其在党内的地位,进而改变薄案的审理结果。

    周永康等为何要向外媒爆料?这无疑一方面表明中共党媒的公信力已丧失殆尽,就连中共高层也知晓这一点;另一方面,说明外部世界、外部的评价对中共领导人、对国人的影响越来越大。

    周永康等人的目的是否实现,从《纽时》发文当天,薄熙来就因涉嫌犯罪被立案侦查并采取强制措施来看,从《纽时》很快从其中国新闻首页将报导撤下看,周等人的计谋似乎作用有限。

    现在的问题是《纽时》为何敢刊登这样的材料呢?虽然其驻上海记者巴尔博扎(David Barboza)声称是独家调查的材料,但有外媒记者证实,多家海外媒体都收到了类似资料。比如美国之音在26日当天的视频节目中,就提到“美国之音驻京记者东方在现场连线介绍,在北京的英文媒体的机构或者说外文媒体的机构都收到一份非常厚的报告,包括温家宝家人的经济投资情况,甚至包括一些审计机构的认证”。从诸多外媒机构同时收到报告来看,显然,这是有组织、有目的、有针对性的活动。

    无疑,从这一点上看,巴尔博扎所言并不实,掺了不少水分,至少文章并非是其所声称的调查10个多月的结果,其可信度也因此大打折扣;而且更为重要的,在黑箱操作的大陆进行涉及中共高层或者其家庭成员的独立调查绝非易事。据香港亲共媒体《明报》报导称,巴尔博扎自1997年起正式受聘于《纽约时报》,主要报导商业新闻,并于2004年起派驻上海。今年4月他还与同事采访过薄瓜瓜,报导后者否认曾驾驶红色法拉利。巴尔博扎主动或者“被主动”在这次有组织、有目的、有针对性的活动中扮演了何种角色?

    如果说巴尔博扎将所收到的爆料材料说成是自己的调查结果而有失“独立”记者的身份外,那么《纽时》编辑为何会原文照登呢?在笔者看来,这大概是因为它符合了西方社会对中共的整体判断,即中共无官不贪,中共贪污腐败已成顽疾,作为中共高层的温家宝和其家族,当然也不例外。如今记者“千辛万苦”写出了如此爆炸性的新闻,毫无疑问可以吸引眼球,自然也给予高度重视,头版重点刊发。

    只是《纽时》为何并未向彭博新闻社学习甄别材料的真伪呢?此前几个月,彭博社透露,该新闻机构收到曝光的所谓习近平家族的材料有1,000多页,其中把习近平亲属的公司报表都收集完全,甚至还有亲属的个人身份证 复印件、家庭住址照片等,还有数年前共事人士的所谓证据、证言等。然而,彭博社进行了反覆的调查和分析后承认,这些材料不能证明习近平曾用个人权力帮家族谋利,没找到习家族任何不正当经营的证据。

    据悉,彭博新闻社收到的抹黑习近平的材料也是来自周永康、曾庆红等江系残余势力。而作为相对严谨的大报的《纽时》,怎么会犯下不经调查就刊登这样的错误呢?难道只有一个原因,即他们太信任自己的记者了吗?

    不管出于什么原因,《纽时》此次自觉或不自觉地成为了中共高层博弈的一粒棋子,周、曾等人正藉此继续煽风点火。而温家宝将如何回应,十分引人关注,因为这很可能决定着薄、周、曾等人的命运。

    http://cn.epochtimes.com/gb/12/10/31/n3718393.htm%E3%80%90%E6%9D%A8%E5%AE%81%E3%80%91-%E3%80%8A%E7%BA%BD%E7%BA%A6%E6%97%B6%E6%8A%A5%E3%80%8B%E4%B8%BA%E4%BD%95%E6%95%A2%E6%9B%9D%E5%85%89%E6%B8%A9%E5%AE%B6%E5%AE%9D%E7%9A%84%E9%BB%91%E6%9D%90%E6%96%99-.html

  • 薄熙来立案同日 中共突停审

    薄熙来立案同日 中共突停审最大活摘器官案

    【大纪元2012年10月27日讯】(大纪元记者古清儿报导)10月26日,前重庆市委书记、中共中央政治局委员薄熙来的全国人大代表资格被罢免后,同日深夜官方又通报,薄因涉嫌犯罪,对其立案侦查并采取强制措施。而原定26日在北京开审的中国最大宗活摘器官案突然取消开庭。

    外界认为,中共在一天时间内对薄熙来做出两大决定,说明中共高层在处理薄案的急迫性。而取消原定26日开庭审理器官买卖案,是因为薄熙来涉及活摘法轮功学员器官贩卖,又在国际社会被广泛曝光,如果此时两案同时展开,外界很容易把薄案与活摘器官联系起来,这样对中共政权的打击会很大,因为活摘器官案一旦大白于天下,必会导致中共政权倒台,目前中共处处为其掩盖。

    薄熙来全国人大代表资格被罢免、立案侦查

    今年4月10日,中共当局鉴于薄熙来涉嫌严重违纪,停止其担任的中央政治局委员、中央委员职务。

    9月28日,薄熙来被当局开除党籍和公职,并将其移交司法机关处理。其中“涉嫌其他犯罪线索”引发关注,外界猜测,对薄熙来案的进一步调查将会出现更严重的指控,并将牵涉到其他的高层领导人。

    10月26日,中共全国人大常委会发公告称,薄熙来被重庆市人大常委会罢免了十一届全国人大代表资格。

    26日深夜11点42分,官方报导称 :“薄熙来因涉嫌犯罪,最高人民检察院经审查决定,依法对其立案侦查并采取强制措施,案件侦查工作正在依法进行中。”

    据悉,中共于11月1日召开的十七届七中全会,除会对给予薄熙来开除党籍的处分予以追认,还将对薄熙来案进行最终定性。外界认为,薄熙来将面临严惩,甚至死刑。其后台周永康、江泽民也将难逃法网。

    最大宗活摘器官案突然取消开庭

    就在中共当局对薄熙来连续做出重要决定后,原定26日在北京开审的中国最大卖肾案突然取消开庭。

    据《法制晚报》报导,被控涉嫌组织出卖人体器官罪的15名被告人原定在海淀法院受审。26日上午9时30分,15名被告人的家属及代理律师在法院门外排起了长队,等待着安检后进入法庭。

    10时50分,原本定于10时开庭的法庭,所有被告人的律师被告知:“不开了,说有个被告人犯了病,需要治疗。”

    该报导称,该案是最大的一起组织出卖人体器官罪案。9个月里,非法摘除51枚肾脏,出售给肾病患者牟利1034万元。被告人中不仅有器官贩子,还有正规医院的医生,甚至副院长。

    为了获取最大利润,主犯郑伟包租一栋别墅,组建了摘肾基地,最多时一天竟摘取了6枚肾脏。

    15名被告人中9男6女,最大的56岁,最小的才20岁,其中4人曾是正规医院的医生,被告人杨国忠原是江苏省徐州市铜山区第二人民医院副院长,樊海雁是徐州瑞博中西医结合医院护士长。22岁的王芳红和20岁的王亚兰刚毕业,就被郑伟通过网路招聘为摘肾基地的护士。

    中国媒体证实官方与黑道仲介组庞大活体器官贩卖网络

    近期,中国官方公布的最大宗活摘器官案中,承认器官仲介罪犯伪造“死刑犯判决书”、“死刑犯器官捐赠志愿书”、“亲属关系器官捐赠志愿书”来活摘器官等细节。

    中国《财经》杂志9月10日在题为《非法买卖51颗肾脏背后:器官由三甲医院洗白》的文章中,详细披露了一个叫郑伟的肾脏器官仲介贩卖器官的黑幕。

    文章透露,被中国公安起诉的案卷中称郑伟贩卖的活摘器官的相关“死刑犯器官捐赠文件”、“亲属之间活体器官捐赠档”都是伪造的。

    这些伪造档一点都没能影响到北京这家正规医院将这些非法获取的活摘器官移植到器官受体者身上。接受郑伟提供非法肾脏的医院,《财经》杂志报导只说是坐落在北京西三环外的三甲军医院。记者在百度上查到,其中涉嫌作案的医生在解放军304医院和301医院工作。

    器官仲介郑伟伪造“死刑犯判决书”和“亲属之间捐献志愿书”

    从中国官方公布的活摘器官案资料显示,不法获得的59颗活体器官中,移植医院所需“死刑犯判决书”、“死刑犯器官捐赠志愿书”、“亲属之间捐赠志愿书”都是伪造档。换句话说,这些活体器官不来自死刑犯、亲属之间,那是谁提供了这些活体器官?这些事先已做好组织配型的活体器官提供者被关押在何处?

    《财经》杂志报导中显示,器官仲介犯郑伟先后买到了四具死刑犯尸体上的8颗肾脏,共支付给工作人员73万元,平均每颗肾脏9万余元。而他做活体的买卖,仅需支付给那些供体不到3万元,加上食宿、摘取等费用,也比9万元低。而且法院也没有给他档,拿回死刑犯的肾脏后,郑伟同样需伪造“死刑判决书”和伪造“死刑犯捐献志愿书”,以便医院安排手术。

    于是,从那以后,郑伟更愿意直接从网络上寻找那些想靠卖肾挣钱的年轻人,然后编造假的“死刑犯判决书”、“器官捐赠志愿书”、“亲属活体器官捐赠志愿书”,不过,接受他提供肾脏的那家三甲军队医院从来没有朝他要这些法律要求的档。

    官方报导称,今年8月份,大陆公安在打击非法器官买卖过程中,在北京、河北、安徽、山东、河南、陕西等18个省市,打掉非法出卖人体器官的28个“黑仲介”团伙,逮捕嫌犯137人,其中非法行医18人,解救127名活体器官提供者。

    不过官方没有报导这些犯罪团伙将多少原本毫无亲属关系的人,假冒伪造成具有捐献资格的亲属,从而进行活体器官捐赠。

    广东首宗涉嫌组织出卖人体器官案8月31日在东莞开庭。该案的主刀医生周凯章,原是广州医学院第三附属医院肾移植专科主任,至2007年,已临床肾移植一千多例。其被“法轮功受迫害真相联合调查团(CIPFG)”列入《关于第二批追查取证对象的公告——追查取证涉嫌迫害法轮功学员的中国大陆医院》的名单上。

    该案令人蹊跷的地方是:中共媒体报导中称只查2011年10月后的问题,而之前所做的移植不追究。分析人士认为,中共不追究的那个部份正是活摘法轮功学员器官最严重时期。

    薄熙来与谷开来涉及活摘器官罪无法再掩盖

    正当外界越来越关注中共活摘法轮功学员器官罪行之际,中共卫生部近期出台试行人体器官获取与分配新规,声称今后移植器官需全国统一分配。此举说明中国大陆器官移植管理混乱,也侧面印证了中共高层知道某些利益集团活体摘取法轮功学员器官的惊天罪行。

    9月份,21届联合国人权理事会在日内瓦召开,对中共活摘法轮功学员器官的指控成为关注焦点。而世纪大案“薄谷开来案”和“王立军案”,尚未揭开谜底的核心部份都涉及活摘器官和贩卖尸体罪行。

    自从王立军闯入美领馆之后,“活摘器官”的内幕就不可避免地大幅曝光。此前《大纪元》曾经报导,王立军给美国政府的材料中,包括了大量对法轮功学员进行迫害的材料,其中还有中共活摘法轮功学员器官的内幕资料。

    大纪元获悉,薄熙来案的核心真相一直被掩盖。为配合江泽民的迫害政策,薄熙来、谷开来涉及活摘器官、非法在国际贩卖尸体等罪恶,英国人海伍德(Neil Heywood)卷入薄谷在国际贩卖器官、尸体等事件被调查,薄熙来和谷开来害怕罪恶被曝光,从而海伍德被“灭口”。

    http://www.epochtimes.com/gb/12/10/27/n3716214.htm-%E8%96%84%E7%86%99%E6%9D%A5%E7%AB%8B%E6%A1%88%E5%90%8C%E6%97%A5-%E4%B8%AD%E5%85%B1%E7%AA%81%E5%81%9C%E5%AE%A1%E6%9C%80%E5%A4%A7%E6%B4%BB%E6%91%98%E5%99%A8%E5%AE%98%E6%A1%88-.html?p=all

October 30, 2012

  • The Cultish Traits of the Chinese Communist Party

    The Cultish Traits of the Chinese Communist Party PDF Print E-mail
    Banned Books

    The Communist Party is essentially an evil cult that harms mankind.

    Although the Communist Party has never called itself a religion, it matches every single trait of a religion. See the table below.

    At the beginning of its establishment, it regarded Marxism as the absolute truth in this world and denied the existence of anything beyond this world. It piously worshiped Marx as its god and exhorted people to engage in a life-long struggle for the goal of building a “communist heaven on earth.”

    The Communist Party is significantly different from any righteous religion. All orthodox religions believe in God and benevolence, and their purpose is to instruct humanity about morality and to save souls. The Communist Party does not believe in God and opposes traditional morality.

    What the Communist Party has done proves itself to be an evil cult. The Communist Party’s doctrines are based upon class struggle, violent revolution, and the dictatorship of the proletariat and have resulted in the so-called “communist revolution” full of blood and violence.

    The red terror under communism has lasted for about a century, bringing disasters to dozens of countries and costing tens of millions of lives. The communist belief, one that created a hell on earth, is nothing but the vilest cult in the world.

    The Communist Party’s cultish traits can be summarized under six headings:

    1. Concoction of Doctrines and Elimination of Dissidents

    The Communist Party holds up Marxism as its religious doctrine and shows it off as the unbreakable truth. The doctrines of the Communist Party lack benevolence and tolerance. Instead, they are full of arrogance.

    Marxism was a product of the initial period of capitalism when productivity was low and science was underdeveloped. It didn’t have a correct understanding at all of the relationships between humanity and society or humanity and nature.

    Unfortunately, this heretical ideology developed into the international communist movement and harmed the human world for over a century before the people discarded it, having found it completely wrong in practice.

    Party leaders since Lenin have always amended the cult’s doctrines. From Lenin’s theory of violent revolution, to Mao Zedong’s theory of continuous revolution under the dictatorship of the proletariat, to Jiang Zemin’s “Three Represents,” the Communist Party’s history is full of such heretical theory and fallacy.

    Eliminating dissidents is the most effective means for the evil cult of communism to spread its doctrine. Because the doctrine and behavior of this evil cult are too ridiculous, the Communist Party has to force people to accept them, relying on violence to eliminate dissidents.

    2. Promoting Worship of the Leader and Supremacist Views

    From Marx to Jiang Zemin, the Communist Party leaders’ portraits are prominently displayed for worship. The absolute authority of the Party leaders forbids any challenge. Mao Zedong was set up as the “red sun” and “big liberator.” The Party spoke outrageously about his writing, saying “one sentence equals 10,000 ordinary sentences.”

    As an ordinary Party member, Deng Xiaoping once dominated Chinese politics like an overlord. Jiang Zemin’s “Three Represents” theory is merely a little over 40 characters, long, including punctuation, but the CCP Fourth Plenary Session boosted it as “providing a creative answer to questions such as what socialism is, how to construct socialism, what kind of party we are building, and how to build the Party.”

    3. Violent Brainwashing and Mind Control

    The CCP’s organization is extremely tight: One needs two Party members’ references before admission; a new member must swear to be loyal to the Party forever once admitted; Party members must pay membership dues, attend organizational activities, and take part in group political study.

    The Party organizations penetrate all levels of the government. There are basic CCP organizations in every single village, town, and neighborhood. The CCP controls not only its Party members and Party affairs, but also those who are not members because the entire regime must “adhere to the Party’s leadership.”.

    Joining the CCP is like signing an irrevocable contract to sell one’s body and soul. With the Party’s rules being always above the laws of the nation, the Party can dismiss any Party member at will, while the individual Party member cannot quit the CCP without incurring severe punishment. Quitting the Party is considered disloyal and will bring about dire consequences.

    4. Urging Violence, Carnage, and Sacrifice for the Party

    Mao Zedong said, “A revolution is not a dinner party, or writing an essay, or painting a picture, or doing embroidery; it cannot be so refined, so leisurely and gentle, so temperate, kind, courteous, restrained, and magnanimous. A revolution is an insurrection, an act of violence by which one class overthrows another.”[4]

    Deng Xiaoping recommended “killing 200,000 people in exchange for 20 years’ stability.”

    Jiang Zemin ordered, “Destroy them [Falun Gong practitioners] physically, ruin their reputation, and bankrupt them financially.”

    5. Denying Belief in God and Smothering Human Nature

    The CCP promotes atheism and claims that religion is the opiate of the people. It used its power to crush all religions in China, and then it deified itself, giving absolute rule of the country to the CCP cult.

    At the same time that the CCP sabotaged religion, it also destroyed traditional culture. It claimed that tradition, morality, and ethics were feudalistic, superstitious, and reactionary, eradicating them in the name of revolution.

    During the Cultural Revolution, widespread ugly phenomena violated Chinese traditions, such as married couples accusing each other, students beating their teachers, fathers and sons turning against each other, Red Guards wantonly killing the innocent, and mobs beating, smashing, and looting. These were the natural consequences of the CCP’s smothering human nature.

    After establishing its regime, the CCP forced minority nationalities to pledge allegiance to the communist leadership, compromising the rich and colorful ethnic culture they had established.

    On June 4, 1989, the so-called “People’s Liberation Army” massacred many students in Beijing. This caused the Chinese to completely lose hope in China’s political future. From then on, everyone’s focus turned to making money.

    From 1999 to this day, the CCP has been brutally persecuting Falun Gong, turning against Truthfulness, Compassion, and Tolerance (the fundamental principles of Falun Gong) and thereby causing an accelerated decline in moral standards.

    Since the beginning of this new century, a new round of illegal land enclosure[6] and seizure of monetary and material resources by the corrupt CCP officials in collusion with profiteers has driven many people to become destitute and homeless.

    The number of people appealing to the government in an attempt to have an injustice settled has increased sharply, and social conflict has intensified. Large-scale protests are frequent, which the police and armed forces have violently suppressed. The fascist nature of the “Republic” has become prominent, and society has lost its moral conscience.

    In the past, a villain didn’t harm his next door neighbors, or, as the saying goes, the fox preys far from home. Nowadays, when people want to con someone, they would rather target their relatives and friends, and call it “killing acquaintances.”

    In the past, Chinese nationals cherished chastity above all else, whereas people today ridicule the poor but not the prostitutes. The history of the destruction of human nature and morals in China is vividly displayed in a ballad below:

    In the 50s people helped one another,
    In the 60s people strove with one another,
    In the 70s people swindled one another,
    In the 80s people cared only for themselves,
    In the 90s people took advantage of anyone they ran into.

    6. Monopolization of the Economy

    The sole purpose of establishing the CCP was to seize power by armed force and then to generate a system of state ownership in which the state holds monopolies in the planned economy. The CCP’s wild ambition far surpasses that of the ordinary evil cults that simply accumulate money.

    In a country of socialist public ownership ruled by the Communist Party, Party organizations that hold great power (that is, the Party committees and branches at various levels) are imposed upon or possess the normal state infrastructure. The possessing Party organizations control state machinery and draw funds directly from the budgets of the governments at different levels. Like a vampire, the CCP has sucked a huge amount of wealth from the nation.

    (Excepts from the first part of Chapter 8 of Nine Commentaries on the Communist party )

    Link to Chapter 8 of the original Essay

    http://www.chinauncensored.com/index.php/banned-books/553-the-cultish-traits-of-the-chinese-communist-party


  • Ai Wei Wei’s Interview With the Chinese Digital Thought Police

    Ai Wei Wei’s Interview With the Chinese Digital Thought Police

    By Brian Fung

    Share Oct 26 2012, 12:49 PM ET 1

    What it is like being a member of the government’s “50-Cent Gang”?

    RTR2CACZ-615.jpgWeb users log on at an Internet cafe in Shanxi province. (Reuters)

    China’s Web censorship machine is in full swing again after The New York Times published a story Thursday on Premier Wen Jiabao’s massive family fortune that stretches into the billions of dollars. Within hours of the report, the Times’ English- and Chinese-language websites had become unreachable from inside the People’s Republic.

    But even before China’s Great Firewall had lumbered into motion, anonymous digital cheerleaders for the government were probably already hard at work spinning Beijing’s response to the news. Members of the so-called “50-Cent Gang” are paid by the state to sway public opinion on Internet forums andchatrooms. These individuals portray themselves online as ordinary Chinese with a point of view, but in an environment where talk is cheap and nobody knows you’re a dog, much less a paid government agent, the 50-Cent Gang generally enjoys free rein.

    Ai Wei Wei, the artist and critic, sat down earlier this month with one of these semi-official public relations officers in Beijing’s employ. Their conversation reveals a surprisingly structured approach to what others might liken to Western Internet trolling:

    Can you describe your work in detail?
    The process has three steps – receive task, search for topic, post comments to guide public opinion. Receiving a task mainly involves ensuring you open your email box every day. Usually after an event has happened, or even before the news has come out, we’ll receive an email telling us what the event is, then instructions on which direction to guide the netizens’ thoughts, to blur their focus, or to fan their enthusiasm for certain ideas. After we’ve found the relevant articles or news on a website, according to the overall direction given by our superiors we start to write articles, post or reply to comments. This requires a lot of skill. You can’t write in a very official manner, you must conceal your identity, write articles in many dif­ferent styles, sometimes even have a dialogue with yourself, argue, debate. In sum, you want to create illusions to attract the attention and comments of netizens.

    The work often borders on psycho-social analysis:

    In a forum, there are three roles for you to play: the leader, the follower, the onlooker or unsuspecting member of the public. The leader is the relatively authoritative speaker, who usually appears after a controversy and speaks with powerful evidence. The public usually finds such users very convincing. There are two opposing groups of followers. The role they play is to continuously debate, argue, or even swear on the forum. This will attract attention from observers. At the end of the argument, the leader appears, brings out some powerful evidence, makes public opinion align with him and the objective is achieved. The third type is the onlookers, the netizens. They are our true target “clients”. We influence the third group mainly through role-playing between the other two kinds of identity. You could say we’re like directors, influencing the audience through our own writing, directing and acting. Sometimes I feel like I have a split personality.

    What the 50-Cent Gang does is no easy task. But its members earn little more than $100 a month for their toil:

    It’s calculated on a monthly basis, according to quantity and quality. It’s basically calculated at 50 yuan per 100 comments. When there’s an unexpected event, the compensation might be higher. If you work together to guide public opinion on a hot topic and several dozen people are posting, the compensation for those days counts for more. Basically, the compensation is very low. I work part-time. On average, the monthly pay is about 500-600 yuan. There are people who work full-time on this. It’s possible they could earn thousands of yuan a month.

    On whether the commenter’s personal convictions clash with his employer’s:

    Do you think the government has the right to guide public opinion?
    Personally, I think absolutely not. But in China, the government absolutely must interfere and guide public opinion. The majority of Chinese netizens are incited too easily, don’t think for themselves and are deceived and incited too easily by false news.

    Do you have to believe in the viewpoints you express? Are you concerned about politics and the future?
    I don’t have to believe in them. Sometimes you know well that what you say is false or untrue. But you still have to say it, because it’s your job. I’m not too concerned about Chinese politics. There’s nothing to be concerned about in Chinese politics.

    The full interview is worth a read.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/10/ai-wei-weis-interview-with-the-chinese-digital-thought-police/264163/

  • China’s Paid Trolls: Meet the 50-Cent Party

    China’s Paid Trolls: Meet the 50-Cent Party
    The Chinese government hires people to distort or deflect conversations on the web. Ai Weiwei persuades an “online commentator” to tell all.

    New Statesman

    (PHOTO: Marcus Bleasdale VII)

    In February 2011, Ai Weiwei tweeted that he would like to conduct an interview with an “online commentator”. Commentators are hired by the Chinese government or the Communist Party of China to post comments favourable towards party policies and to shape public opinion on internet message boards and forums. The commentators are known as the 50-Cent Party, as they are said to be paid 50 cents for every post that steers a discussion away from anti-party content or that advances the Communist Party line.

    Below is the transcript of Ai’s interview with an online commentator. As requested, an iPad was given as compensation for the interview. To protect the interviewee, relevant personal information has been concealed in this script.

    Question: What’s your name, age, city of residence and online username?

    Answer: I cannot make my name public. I’m 26. I have too many usernames. If I want to use one, I just register it. I won’t mention them here.

    What do you call the work you do now?

    It doesn’t matter what you call it: online commentator, public opinion guide, or even “the 50-Cent Party” that everyone’s heard of.

    What is your level of education and work experience? How did you begin the work of guiding public opinion?

    I graduated from university and studied media. I once worked for a TV channel, then in online media. I’ve always been in the news media industry, for four or five years now.Over a year ago, a friend asked me if I wanted to be an online commentator, to earn some extra money. I said I’d give it a try. Later, I discovered it was very easy.

    When and from where will you receive directives for work?

    Almost every morning at 9am I receive an email from my superiors – the internet publicity office of the local government – telling me about the news we’re to comment on for the day. Sometimes it specifies the website to comment on, but most of the time it’s not limited to certain websites: you just find relevant news and comment on it.

    Can you describe your work in detail?

    The process has three steps – receive task, search for topic, post comments to guide public opinion. Receiving a task mainly involves ensuring you open your email box every day. Usually after an event has happened, or even before the news has come out, we’ll receive an email telling us what the event is, then instructions on which direction to guide the netizens’ thoughts, to blur their focus, or to fan their enthusiasm for certain ideas. After we’ve found the relevant articles or news on a website, according to the overall direction given by our superiors we start to write articles, post or reply to comments. This requires a lot of skill. You can’t write in a very official manner, you must conceal your identity, write articles in many dif­ferent styles, sometimes even have a dialogue with yourself, argue, debate. In sum, you want to create illusions to attract the attention and comments of netizens.

    In a forum, there are three roles for you to play: the leader, the follower, the onlooker or unsuspecting member of the public. The leader is the relatively authoritative speaker, who usually appears after a controversy and speaks with powerful evidence. The public usually finds such users very convincing. There are two opposing groups of followers. The role they play is to continuously debate, argue, or even swear on the forum. This will attract attention from observers. At the end of the argument, the leader appears, brings out some powerful evidence, makes public opinion align with him and the objective is achieved. The third type is the onlookers, the netizens. They are our true target “clients”. We influence the third group mainly through role-playing between the other two kinds of identity. You could say we’re like directors, influencing the audience through our own writing, directing and acting. Sometimes I feel like I have a split personality.

    Regarding the three roles that you play, is that a common tactic? Or are there other ways?

    There are too many ways. It’s kind of psychological. Netizens nowadays are more thoughtful than before. We have many ways. You can make a bad thing sound even worse, make an elaborate account, and make people think it’s nonsense when they see it. In fact, it’s like two negatives make a positive. When it’s reached a certain degree of mediocrity, they’ll think it might not be all that bad.

    What is the guiding principle of your work?

    The principle is to understand the guiding thought of superiors, the direction of public opinion desired, then to start your own work.

    Can you reveal the content of a “task” email?

    For example, “Don’t spread rumours, don’t believe in rumours”, or “Influence public understanding of X event”, “Promote the correct direction of public opinion on XXXX”, “Explain and clarify XX event; avoid the appearance of untrue or illegal remarks”, “For the detrimental social effect created by the recent XX event, focus on guiding the thoughts of netizens in the correct direction of XXXX”.

    What are the categories of information that you usually receive?

    They are mainly local events. They cover over 60 to 70 per cent of local instructions – for example, people who are filing complaints or petitioning.

    For countrywide events, such as the Jasmine Revolution [the pro-democracy protests that took place across the country in 2011], do you get involved?

    For popular online events like the Jasmine Revolution, we have never received a related task. I also thought it was quite strange. Perhaps we aren’t senior enough.

    Can you tell us the content of the commentary you usually write?

    The netizens are used to seeing unskilled comments that simply say the government is great or so and so is a traitor. They know what is behind it at a glance. The principle I observe is: don’t directly praise the government or criticise negative news. Moreover, the tone of speech, identity and stance of speech must look as if it’s an unsuspecting member of public; only then can it resonate with netizens. To sum up, you want to guide netizens obliquely and let them change their focus without realising it.

    Can you go off the topic?

    Of course you can go off the topic. When transferring the attention of netizens and

    blurring the public focus, going off the topic is very effective. For example, during the census, everyone will be talking about its truthfulness or necessity; then I’ll post jokes that appeared in the census. Or, in other instances, I would publish adverts to take up space on political news reports.

    Can you tell us a specific, typical process of “guiding public opinion”?

    For example, each time the oil price is about to go up, we’ll receive a notification to “stabilise the emotions of netizens and divert public attention”. The next day, when news of the rise comes out, netizens will definitely be condemning the state, CNPC and Sinopec. At this point, I register an ID and post a comment: “Rise, rise however you want, I don’t care. Best if it rises to 50 yuan per litre: it serves you right if you’re too poor to drive. Only those with money should be allowed to drive on the roads . . .”

    This sounds like I’m inviting attacks but the aim is to anger netizens and divert the anger and attention on oil prices to me. I would then change my identity several times and start to condemn myself. This will attract more attention. After many people have seen it, they start to attack me directly. Slowly, the content of the whole page has also changed from oil price to what I’ve said. It is very effective.

    What’s your area of work? Which websites do you comment on? Which netizens do you target?

    There’s no limit on which websites I visit. I mainly deal with local websites, or work on Tencent. There are too many commentators on Sohu, Sina, etc. As far as I know, these websites have dedicated internal departments for commenting.

    Can you tell which online comments are by online commentators?

    Because I do this, I can tell at a glance that about 10 to 20 per cent out of the tens of thousands of comments posted on a forum are made by online commentators.

    Will you debate with other people online? What sorts of conflicts do you have? How do you control and disperse emotion?

    Most of the time we’re debating with ourselves. I usually never debate with netizens and I’ll never say I’ve been angered by a netizen or an event. You could say that usually when I’m working, I stay rational.

    When the government says, “Don’t believe in rumours, don’t spread rumours,” it achieves the opposite effect. For example, when Sars and the melamine in milk case broke out, people tended to choose not to trust the government when faced with the choices of “Don’t trust rumours” and “Don’t trust the government”.

    I think this country and government have got into a rather embarrassing situation. No matter what happens – for example, if a person commits a crime, or there’s a traffic accident – as long as it’s a bad event and it’s publicised online, there will be people who condemn the government. I think this is very strange.

    This is inevitable, because the government encompasses all. When all honour is attributed to you, all mistakes are also attributed to you. Apart from targeted events, are individuals targeted? Would there be this kind of directive?

    There should be. I think for the Dalai Lama, there must be guidance throughout the country. All people in China hate the Dalai Lama and Falun Gong somewhat. According to my understanding, the government has truly gone a bit over the top. Before I got involved in this circle, I didn’t know anything. So I believe that wherever public opinion has been controlled relatively well, there will always have been commentators involved.

    How do your superiors inspect and assess your work?

    The superiors will arrange dedicated auditors who do random checks according to the links we provide. Auditors usually don’t assess, because they always make work requirements very clear. We just have to do as they say and there won’t be any mistakes.

    How is your compensation decided?

    It’s calculated on a monthly basis, according to quantity and quality. It’s basically calculated at 50 yuan per 100 comments. When there’s an unexpected event, the compensation might be higher. If you work together to guide public opinion on a hot topic and several dozen people are posting, the compensation for those days counts for more. Basically, the compensation is very low. I work part-time. On average, the monthly pay is about 500-600 yuan. There are people who work full-time on this. It’s possible they could earn thousands of yuan a month.

    Do you like your work?

    I wouldn’t say I like it or hate it. It’s just a bit more to do each day. A bit more pocket money each month, that’s all.

    What’s the biggest difficulty in the work?

    Perhaps it’s that you have to guess the psychology of netizens. You have to learn a lot of writing skills. You have to know how to imitate another person’s writing style. You need to understand how to gain the trust of the public and influence their thoughts.

    Why can’t you reveal your identity? Why do you think it’s sensitive?

    Do you want me to lose my job? Whatever form or name we use to post on any forums or blogs is absolutely confidential. We can’t reveal our identity, and I definitely wouldn’t reveal that I’m a professional online commentator.

    If we do, what would be the purpose of our existence? Exposure would affect not just me, it would create an even greater negative effect on our “superiors”.

    What do you mean by “superiors”?

    Our superior leaders – above that should be the propaganda department.

    Is your identity known to your family? Your friends?

    No. I haven’t revealed it to my family or friends. If people knew I was doing this, it might have a negative effect on my reputation.

    You say: “If I reveal inside information, without exaggeration this could lead to fatality.” Do you think that the consequence would be so serious?

    With my identity, I’m involved in the media and also the internet. If I really reveal my identity or let something slip, it could have an incalculable effect on me.

    If you say you want to quit, will there be resistance? Are there any strings attached?

    Not at all. This industry is already very transparent. For me, it’s just a part-time job. It’s like any other job. It’s not as dark as you think.

    How many hours do you go online each day and on which sites? Do you rest at the weekend?

    I go online for six to eight hours nearly every day. I’m mainly active on our local BBS and some large mainstream internet media and microblogs. I don’t work over weekends, but I’ll sign in to my email account and see if there’s any important instruction.

    In daily life, will you still be thinking about your online work?

    Now and then. For example, when I see a piece of news, I’ll think about which direction the superiors will request it to be guided in and how I would go about it. It’s a bit of an occupational hazard.

    Do you watch CCTV News and read the People’s Daily?

    I usually follow all the news, particularly the local news. But I generally don’t watch CCTV News, because it’s too much about harmony.

    Do you go on Twitter? Who do you follow?

    Yes. I follow a few interesting people, including Ai Weiwei. But I don’t speak on Twitter, just read and learn.

    How big a role do you think this industry plays in guiding public opinion in China?

    Truthfully speaking, I think the role is quite big. The majority of netizens in China are actually very stupid. Sometimes, if you don’t guide them, they really will believe in rumours.

    Because their information is limited to begin with. So, with limited information, it’s very difficult for them to express a political view.

    I think they can be incited very easily. I can control them very easily. Depending on how I want them to be, I use a little bit of thought and that’s enough. It’s very easy. So I think the effect should be quite significant.

    Do you think the government has the right to guide public opinion?

    Personally, I think absolutely not. But in China, the government absolutely must interfere and guide public opinion. The majority of Chinese netizens are incited too easily, don’t think for themselves and are deceived and incited too easily by false news.

    Do you have to believe in the viewpoints you express? Are you concerned about politics and the future?

    I don’t have to believe in them. Sometimes you know well that what you say is false or untrue. But you still have to say it, because it’s your job. I’m not too concerned about Chinese politics. There’s nothing to be concerned about in Chinese politics.

    http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/politics/2012/10/china%E2%80%99s-paid-trolls-meet-50-cent-party

October 25, 2012

  • Explosive New Video Details Organ Transplant Abuses in China

    Explosive New Video Details Organ Transplant Abuses in China

    Doctors, independent experts call for end to crimes against humanity

    New video details mass killings to supply multi-million dollar organ transplant industry.

    New video details mass killings to supply multi-million dollar organ transplant industry.

    NEW YORK—A new online video details how, for the past ten years, Chinese military hospitals have operated a multi-million dollar human trafficking business that murders Chinese citizens to sell their organs (video). Experts cited in the video estimate that tens of thousands of prisoners of conscience, mostly Falun Gong practitioners, have been killed so that their organs could be sold for profit. 

    Renowned Canadian human rights lawyer David Matas dubbed such abuses “a new form of evil on this planet.” Dr. Gabriel Danovitch, a leading transplant surgeon from the University of California in Los Angeles, calls such practices “abhorrent” and a “crime against humanity” that must stop.

    The video, produced by New York-based New Tang Dynasty Television (ntdtv.org), comes at a particularly salient time. Almost immediately after its release, Forbes contributor Eamonn Fingleton cited the video as one of two on China that the U.S. presidential candidates must watch (report).

    The Bo Xilai Connection

    As the Communist Party’s changing of the guard and the trial for former Chongqing Party-chief Bo Xilai approach, the organ harvesting issue is particularly relevant given Bo and his deputy Wang Lijun’s apparent involvement in organ transplant abuses (see factsheet). 

    “Despite the mounting evidence of these crimes, mainstream media have been largely silent on this issue, but as this video shows, credible voices from the medical and policymaking communities are raising the alarm that horrific things are happening in China that can no longer be ignored,” says Levi Browde, Executive Director of the Falun Dafa Information Center. 

    “These abuses are not just Chinese people’s problem. They tear at the very fabric of our humanity,” says Browde. “Worse yet, in a transnational industry like organ transplants, people around the world—be they patients or doctors or pharmaceutical companies—are, unwittingly or not, complicit. We can’t just turn a blind eye.”

    * To view the video, see here.
    * To sign a petition urging an end to organ harvesting from prisoners in China and calling for further independent investigations, see here.
    * For a Falun Dafa Information Center Fact Sheet on organ harvesting, including the connection to Bo Xilai and Wang Lijun, see here.

    http://faluninfo.net/article/1260/

October 22, 2012

  • Ahead of Tonight’s China Debate: Two Must-See Videos for the Candidates

    Ahead of Tonight’s China Debate: Two Must-See Videos for the Candidates

    Supporters of the Falungong spiritual movement...

    Supporters of the Falungong spiritual movement protest the opening by  China’s Vice President Xi Jinpingof Australia’s first Chinese Medicine Confucius Institute in Melbourne in  2010. Falungong is banned in China and it alleges that under former Chinese president Jiang Zemin a program was launched to “harvest” organs from its supporters. Image credit: AFP via @daylife)

    Chinese leaders and their surrogates in the United States have been working hard this political season to calm American concerns about the rise of China. But predictions of China’s impending “implosion” are just that —  predictions. And many of them come from people who consciously want to deflect the attention of the American electorate from the real issue: as the United States becomes increasingly dependent on Chinese finance, it is rapidly losing its economic sovereignty. Worse, it  is falling under the shadow of  a nation — China — whose values  are about as remote as those of any major modern nation.  As it happens,  two YouTube videos have just been released that underline the extent of America’s   failure to understand the real China. We can only hope Barack Obama and Mitt  Romney have time to take a look ahead of their encounter tonight, in which they are expected to spend much time discussing China.

    The first clip  is entitled, “Killed For Organs: China’s Secret State Transplant Business,” and it gives a horrific account of the Chinese state’s forced “harvesting” of human kidneys, livers, and other vital organs. In most cases, the “donors” are prisoners and many of them — perhaps a majority — are  prisoners of conscience. Their organs are sold to a booming domestic and global organ  transplant industry, with hearts, for instance, fetching well over $100,000 each. There have been allegations that supporters of the Falungong spiritual movement have been particularly targeted. In many cases organs fitting a recipient’s physiology can be made available within a week and the removal of the “donor’s” organs constitutes his or her execution. The clip includes a particularly graphic comment from the Canadian political campaigner  David Kilgour: “It makes you think of some grotesque restaurant where you pick your lobster — except that these are human beings we are talking about.” If this clip does not focus American attention on the ethical  implications of China’s rise, nothing will.

    The second clip is a commentary by the prominent management writer Richard D’Aveni describing the extent of China’s challenge to the American economy. His contribution is, I believe, of historic significance in that he is the first top American scholar to  speak so clearly about the crisis now facing American capitalism. (D’Aveni’s comments are a complete break from a pattern of self-censorship which has long restrained the East Asian studies field in American universities. The problem has been scholars’ increasing dependence on funding from politically motivated donors — not least many  American corporations that profit from shipping jobs to  China). D’Aveni comes to the subject as an established and highly respected expert on management and his authority is bolstered by the fact that he enjoys tenure at Tuck,  one of America’s top management schools.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvAOOwvJMZs&feature=youtu.be

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4L0WSSefHU

    —————————————————

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/eamonnfingleton/2012/10/22/ahead-of-tonights-china-debate-two-must-see-videos-for-the-candidates/